mangiabenepasta.com
Your place for traditional Italian recipes
Custom Search
Italian Bread Recipes
RECIPES
Olive and Rosemary Bread
Whole Wheat Ricotta Bread
Fig Rye Bread
Polenta Bread
Olive Oil Bread from Mantua
Semolina Bread
Pane Toscano
Olive and Rosemary Bread 
(Makes 2 loaves)

Ingredients:

1 pkg. (2-1/2 teaspoons) dry yeast
2 cups warm water (105-115 degrees F)
4 cups all-purpose or bread flour
1 cup whole-wheat flour
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
2 teaspoons salt
1-1/2 cups mixed olives, pitted and coarsely chopped

Directions:

In a bowl, combine 1 cup of warm water with the yeast.  Let sit for 5 minutes.
Whisk in 1 cup of bread flour, cover, and let sit until thick and bubbly, about 1
hour.

In a large bowl, combine the remaining 3 cups of bread flour, the whole-wheat
flour, rosemary, and salt, Add the yeast mixture and 1 cup of warm water and
stir until a soft dough forms. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and
knead until smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes.  Form into a smooth ball.
Oil a bowl.  Transfer the dough to the bowl and turn once to coat.
Cover and let rise in a warm place until double in size, about 1 to 1-1/2 hours.

Oil a baking sheet.  Punch down the dough and transfer to a floured surface.
Cut the dough in half.  Flatten each half into a 8 x12-inch oval.
Scatter the olives evenly over the dough. Tightly roll up each oval to form a loaf
12" long. Place the loaves about 6" apart on the baking sheet.
Cover and let rise until double in size, about 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
Using a sharp knife, make diagonal slashes 1/2" deep on the top of each loaf.
Bake 40-45 minutes, or until golden brown.
Transfer loaves to a rack to cool.
Whole Wheat Ricotta Bread

(Makes 1 loaf)
Whole Wheat Ricotta Bread
You can make this bread with just all-purpose flour, if you prefer.

Ingredients:

1/3 cup milk, warmed to 105 - 115 degrees F.
1 package (2-1/4 teaspoons) dry active yeast
2-1/2 tablespoons sugar, divided
1 cup ricotta cheese
1 egg
2 tablespoons melted butter or vegetable oil
1-1/4 cups whole wheat flour
1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour, divided
1 teaspoon salt

Directions:

In a small bowl, combine the warm milk, yeast and 1/2 tablespoon sugar.
Allow the mixture to rest for 5 to 10 minutes until foamy.

In the bowl of an electric mixture, combine the ricotta, egg, and butter (or oil).
Use the paddle attachment to blend the ingredients. Add the yeast mixture and
mix to combine. Add the whole wheat flour, 1 cup of all-purpose flour, salt and
remaining sugar. Mix until a dough begins to form. Change from the paddle
attachment to a dough hook. Knead the dough until smooth and it gathers
around the hook. Add the remaining 1/4 cup of flour if the dough is too sticky.
Gather the dough together with your hands; transfer to a lightly floured surface.
Knead the dough for just a minute until it is smooth and elastic.
Place the dough into a greased bowl; cover with a kitchen towel.
Set the dough aside to rise for about 1-1/2 hours or until double in volume.

Punch the dough down; form it into a loaf. Place the dough in a greased 9 x 5-
inch loaf pan; cover with a kitchen towel. Set the dough aside for 30 to 45
minutes. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
Bake for 30 minutes or until the top is golden brown.
Allow the bread to cool in the pan for 10 minutes.
Fig Rye Bread
(Makes 2 loaves)

Ingredients:

1 pkg. (2-1/2 teaspoons) dry yeast
2 cups water (105-115 degrees F)
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon salt
3-2/3 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups rye flour
2-1/2 cups dried figs, chopped

Directions:

In a bowl, combine yeast, water, and sugar.  Stir to dissolve.
Let mixture sit until foamy, about 10 minutes.

Add oil and salt to yeast mixture. Gradually stir in 3 cups all-purpose flour and
2 cups rye flour. Knead on a floured surface until smooth and elastic, about 10
minutes. Add more flour if dough is too sticky.

Oil a large bowl.  Add dough and turn to coat.
Cover and let rise in a warm area until double in size, about 1 to 1-1/2 hours.

Dust 2 large baking sheets with flour.
Punch dough down and transfer to a lightly floured surface.
Press dough to a 1" thick rectangle.  Sprinkle figs over evenly.
Roll up dough and knead to distribute figs evenly.  Divide dough in half.
Roll each piece into a 16" loaf.  Transfer to baking sheets.
Cover and let rise in a warm area, about 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Bake loaves until golden brown about 45
minutes. Use a spray bottle to spray the oven with water every 10 minutes to
create a crisp crust. Cool loaves on wire racks.
Polenta Bread
(Makes 1 round loaf)

Ingredients:

3 cups bread flour
1/2 cup quick-cooking polenta, plus extra for baking sheet
1 pkg. (2-1/2 teaspoons) dry fast-rise yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1-1/3 cups warm water (105-115 degrees F)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water

Directions:

In a large bowl, combine the flour, polenta, yeast, and salt.
Stir to mix well.  Add warm water and olive oil and stir until a dough forms.
Gather the dough into a ball and transfer to a floured surface.
Knead until smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes.
Add more flour if the dough is too sticky. The dough should remain in a
rounded shape and not flatten when left for a minute or two. If the dough
flattens, add more flour. Cover and let rise in a warm area until double in
size, about 1 to1-1/2 hours.

Sprinkle baking sheet with a little polenta.
Punch the dough down and knead a few times on a floured surface.
Shape into a ball and place on baking sheet.  Cover and let rise 30-40
minutes.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. with rack in the middle of the oven.
Using a sharp knife, make a 1/2" deep cut across the top of the dough.
Brush the surface with egg mixture.  Bake for 15 minutes.
Reduce the temperature to 375 degrees and continue to bake until golden
and crusty. Transfer loaf to a wire rack to cool.
Olive Oil Bread from Mantua

(Makes 2 loaves)
Olive Oil Bread
This bread is from Lombardy, Italy. 
Serve it with sliced prosciutto, chucks of salami and cheese, or other antipasti.

Ingredients:

1 package (2-1/4 teaspoon) dry yeast
2-1/2 cups warm water, (105 to 115 degrees F.), divided
1-1/4 cups whole wheat flour
3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 cup olive oil’

Directions:

Sprinkle the yeast into 1-1/4 cups of the warm water. Allow to dissolve for 5
minutes. In a large bowl, combine the two flours. Make a well in the center of the
flour; pour in the dissolved yeast.

Use a spoon to draw enough of the flour into the yeast to form a soft paste.
Cover the bowl with a towel and set aside for 20 minutes.
The paste should become frothy and like a sponge.

Add the salt and oil to the mixture. Stir the rest of the flour from the sides of the
bowl into it. Add some of the remaining water, as needed to form a very sticky
dough. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Knead the dough until
smooth, 8 to 10 minutes.

Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl; turn the dough to coat both sides.
Cover with a towel and set aside to rise until double in size, about 50 minutes.
Punch the dough down, reform into a ball, and put it back in the bowl.
Cover with a towel and allow to rise a second time for 40 minutes.

Punch the dough down. Divide the dough into 2 equal pieces.
Shape each piece into a loaf about 10 inches in length.
Place on a parchment lined baking sheet.
Cover with a towel and allow to rest for 15 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
Cut a lengthwise slit, about 1/2-inch deep, down the center of each loaf.
Bake for 30 to 25 minutes or until golden and hollow sounding when tapped.
Transfer the loaves to a wire rack to cool.
Semolina Bread
(Makes 2 loaves)

This bread comes from Puglia and is commonly known as Pugliese.
Its open texture is good for absorbing oil, making it a good bread to use for
bruschetta. The semolina flour gives the bread a golden color and crisp
crust.

Ingredients:

Starter:
1/2 teaspoon dry yeast
1/3 cup warm water, 105 to 115 degrees F.)
1/3 cup flour

Dough:
1-3/4 teaspoon (remainder of package) dry yeast
3/4 cup warm water, 105 to 115 degrees F., divided
1 cup unbleached flour
2 cups semolina flour
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons olive oil

Extra semolina flour for dusting

Directions:

To  make the starter:
Sprinkle the yeast into the water in a small bowl. Leave for 5 minutes; stir
to dissolve. Add the flour and mix to form a thick paste. Cover with a towel;
let ferment at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours.

To make the dough:
Sprinkle the yeast into 1/2 cup of the water in a small bowl. Leave for 5
minutes; stir to dissolve. Combine the flours and salt in a large bowl.
Make a well in the center of the flour; pour in the dissolved yeast, oil, and
starter. Stir in the flour. Add the remaining water, as needed to form a soft,
sticky dough. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface.
Knead the dough until smooth, 8 to 10 minutes.

Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl; turn the dough to coat both sides.
Cover with a towel and set aside to rise until double in size, about 1-1/2
hours.

Punch the dough down and divide into 2 equal pieces.
Shape each piece into a round loaf. Place the loaves on an oiled baking
sheet dusted with semolina flour. Flatten each loaf slightly with the palm of
your hand. Sprinkle the tops with semolina flour.
Cover with a towel; allow to rise until double in size, about 1-1/2 hours.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
Bake for 30 minutes, until lightly golden and hollow sounding when tapped.
Transfer the loaves to a wire rack to cool.
Pane Toscano
(Makes 2 loaves)

This typical Tuscan bread is made without salt. The absence of salt goes
back to a time when there was a heavy salt tax. Unwilling to submit to the
tax, the Tuscans created breads without salt. These breads have a very
yeasty flavor but quickly become stale. Tuscan cooks have a tradition of
dishes using stale bread, such as panzanella salad and zuppa alla
pomodoro.

Ingredients:

Starter:
3-1/2 teaspoon dry yeast
2/3 cup warm water, 105 to 115 degrees F.
1 cup unbleached flour

Dough:
2-1/4 cups unbleached flour
1-1/4 cups warm water, 105 to 115 degrees F.

Directions:

To  make the starter:
Sprinkle the yeast into the water in a small bowl. Leave for 5 minutes; stir to
dissolve. Add the flour and mix to form a thick paste.
Cover with a towel; let ferment at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours.

To make the dough:
Put the flour in a large bowl. Make a well in the center of the flour and add the
starter. Pour in about half of the water. Stir in the flour and enough of the
remaining water to make a wet, butterlike dough. Cover the bowl with a towel
and let rise until double in size, about 40 minutes.

Turn the dough onto a well floured work surface. Use floured hands and a
dough scraper to knead the dough until smooth and elastic, about 10
minutes. Work in extra flour, only if necessary, to create a manageable but
still very moist dough.

Divide the dough into 2 equal pieces. Handle the dough carefully to not
deflate it. Shape each piece into an oval loaf. Place the loaves on an oiled
baking sheet. Cover with a towel and allow to rise until double in size, about
20 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Sprinkle a light dusting of flour over the
loaves. Bake for 35 minutes or until lightly golden and hollow sounding when
tapped. Transfer to a wire rack to cool.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Active Yeast has coarse granules that should be dissolved in a warm liquid to 'bloom' or activate and get foamy; adding a pinch of sugar with the yeast encourages the blooming process. This takes about 5 to 10 minutes.

Instant Yeast includes bread-machine, rapid-rise and quick rise yeast.  They're finer in texture and can be added directly to dry ingredients; no blooming is necessary.  Many promise a shorter rising time but that isn't necessarily a good thing because dough develops flavor and texture as it rises.
Home     |    Privacy Policy    |   Contact Us
Copyright  2001 - 2016   Sandra Laux
GREAT PASTRY BOARD
Beautifully hand crafted of the finest
hardwood by skilled woodworkers in
Wisconsin.  The  board has a front lip and
backsplash to protect your countertop
while it stays in place.  Perfect for rolling
out cookie dough, pie crusts and much
more.
RELATED ITEMS
Semolina, made from the finest durum wheat, is commonly used to make pasta, but it also makes a magnificent loaf of bread.

If you love to make bread you need a good
heavy-duty mixer.  This 275-watt 10-speed
stand mixer has a 4-1/2-quart stainless-
steel bowl, and locking tilt-head design. It
includes a flat beater, wire whip, and dough
hook.
Use an instant-read thermometer to check the temperature of yout water when proofing yeast.
Butter bells safely keep your butter fresh and spreadable without refrigeration for up to 30 days on your countertop.  You can enjoy that warm bread right out of the oven
spread with creamy butter.
Yeast dough rises best when it's just above
room temperature, between 75 and 85
degrees F.  If your kitchen is drafty or cool,
try one of the following places:

Inside a gas oven with the door shut - the
heat should not be turned on but the pilot
light will provide a little extra heat.

Inside an electric oven with the door shut
and the oven light turned on.  The heat of
the bulb will provide a little heat.

Inside a microwave with the door shut.

On top of the refrigerator - the compressor
gives off a little heat.

Near a radiator or space heater - but not
directly on top of it.

In a closed space with a saucepan of hot
water next to the dough.
HOLIDAY BREAD RECIPES
St. Joseph's Day Bread  >>
Casatiello  >>
Colomba di Pasqua - Italian Easter Dove Bread  >>
Easter Egg Bread  >>
Panettone  >>
Pandoro  >>
Homemade Limoncello
Ricotta Cheese
Types of Grain
Roasted Chestnuts
Candied Orange Peel
SPECIAL
FEATURES
Home page basic 120 x 600
INGREDIENTS
Borlotti Beans - Dry
Print Friendly and PDF
Share
DELICIOUS JAMS AND SPREADS
FROM CYBERCUCINA
PAPER BREAD
MOLDS
You Might Also Like
Prosciutto Bread
Taralli - Italian Bread Rings
Garlic Knots
VITAMIX

Vitamix is trusted by more professional
chefs and major chain restaurants than
any other brand to create a variety of fresh,
flavorful dishes from whole-food
ingredients.

The machine can be used to quickly
prepare frozen drinks, smoothies, nut
butters, frozen desserts, dips, and salsas
for everyday life and weekend entertaining.
Smoothies always turn out 100% smooth-
berry seeds, apple seeds, ice and other
hard bits are totally pulverized and
drinkable. Make great low-cal salad
dressings using fresh herbs, garlic, and
low fat cottage cheese or buttermilk.
You can also make a delicious tomato
soup with home grown tomatoes, fresh
basil, garlic, and onion.

You'll soon find that meals are coming
together quicker and you will be eating
healthier.
Sur La Table Healthy Eating_300x250